masthead

In the past we have seen the performance of SFR, now try to go further with a more intense and difficult program of training act to improve the performance in the climb. Many believe that the climbers, those who are high up, have innate talents, this is partly true, but it is also true that to go up strong need specific training and a lot of power. Obviously physical slender, with muscles that provides a prevalence of red muscle fibers, slow contraction, off white, a fast contraction, are at an advantage,

but even the strongest sprinters started to perform specific work to better address the increased and more competitive even when the path is not just pot. As usual, the repetition of the athletic is the essential element, namely the implementation of the climbs, but we can improve it with a specific good training. This will improve our ability to tackle an ascent, with a low frequency of cycling, to a high value of pulse and with a good dose of muscle pain, so we get used. All of which are found in the most difficult climbs and long, and with a good workout can become less "enemy". Like any proposed training is advising as a real table is achieved only on the specific requirements for athletes to be subjected to a test by which we will draw up the loads of work and recovery times. This workout can also be done on an indoor trainer, which facilitates the execution of those who have problems of time and find the appropriate path. The latter should provide an uphill slope as constant as possible and with a maximum of 6-8%, and its length should be such as to make a long journey over twenty minutes. The attitude you should take the saddle is equal to that of FSR, and well seated in the saddle and be careful not to pull on the handlebars with his arms, chest well stopped. The frequency of cycling should certify between 30 and 40 rides per minute. Depending on the frequency ratio should be chosen appropriately. The heart rate is between 80/85% and 95% of HR Max, in particular the latter can be reached at the end of the repetition, while the rest of the performance is better to remain in the range between 85 and 90% of HR Max. In this case we should choose an appropriate enabling us to then have the optimal frequency of cycling for training while remaining within the recommended range of HR. In the table of training is also included a phase of warm up to be carried out in a gradual way, starting with a 55/60% of HR Max to arrive at the final stage of heating to 80% of HR Max; was inserted a phase of slow and agility that will be performed at a constant HR 50/60% of HR Max. Since the middle of the table then there is also a phase of training in the plains. It is not included in the table, already demanding for time and effort, but it would be appropriate to include a third exit after the second training week, about two hours to be carried out on a flat path of FC 80/85% of HR Max a pedalling cadence of 90-100 RPM. Finally some notes for practical training. The recommended recovery time, will be bound by the travel time of the descent, if it is greater than that proposed no problem. If the workout was too hard you should reduce the workload by half, halving the time of repeated upward, doubling the recovery time and halving the time of training in the plains. Then you can gradually increase the load, first by increasing the travel time of the climb, then the time to workout in the plains, thus reducing the recovery time. Ever so gradually, without haste. But it is a very challenging workout, whether it is necessary for recovery. Here is a proposal for 4 weeks with two outputs of specific training (and a possible third exit into agility as explained above):

1st weeks

1st workout
Warm up 30' to 90 RPM
1st repeat 5' recovery 3'
2nd repeat 8' recovery 3'
3rd repeat 12' recovery 2'
4th repeat 15' recovery 2'
5th repeat 10' recovery 2'
6th repeat 8' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM

2nd workout
Warm up 30' to 90 RPM
1st repeat 8' recovery 3'
2nd repeat 10' recovery 3'
3rd repeat 12' recovery 2'
4th repeat 15' recovery 2'
5th repeat 18' recovery 2'
6th repeat 12' recovery 2'
7th repeat 10' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM

2nd weeks

1st workout
Warm up 30'to 90 RPM
1st repeat 8' recovery 2'30''
2nd repeat 10' recovery 2'
3rd repeat 12' recovery 2'
4th repeat 18' recovery 2'
5th repeat 20' recovery 2'30''
6th repeat 12' recovery 2'
7th repeat 10' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM

2nd workout
Warm up 15'to 90 RPM
60' to 90 RPM and 80% of HR Max
1st repeat 10' recovery 2'
2nd repeat 12' recovery 2'
3rd repeat 14' recovery 2'
4th repeat 16' recovery 2'30''
5th repeat 18' recovery 2'30''
6th repeat 12' recovery 2'
7th repeat 10' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM

3rd weeks

1st workout
Warm up 30' to 90 RPM
1st repeat 10' recovery 2'
2nd repeat 12' recovery 2'
3rd repeat 14' recovery 2'30''
4th repeat 16' recovery 2'30''
5th repeat 18' recovery 2'30''
6th repeat 20' recovery 3'
7th repeat 15' recovery 3'
8th repeat 10' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM

2nd workout
Warm up 15' to 90 RPM
60' to 90 RPM and 80% of HR Max
1st repeat 10' recovery 2'
2nd repeat 12' recovery 2'
3rd repeat 14' recovery 2'30''
4th repeat 16' recovery 2'30''
5th repeat 18' recovery 2'30''
6th repeat 20' recovery 3'
7th repeat 15' recovery 3'
8th repeat 10' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM

4th weeks

1st workout
Warm up 15' to 90 RPM
30'to 90 RPM and 80% of HR Max
1st repeat 15' recovery 2'
2nd repeat 18' recovery 2'
3rd repeat 20' recovery 2'
30' to 90 RPM and 85% of HR Max
1st repeat 14' recovery 2'30''
5th repeat 18' recovery 2'30''
6th repeat 20' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM

2nd workout
Warm up 15'to 90 RPM
45'to 90 RPM and 85% of HR Max
1st repeat 15' recovery 2'
2nd repeat 18' recovery 2'
3rd repeat 20' recovery 2'
45'to 90 RPM and 85% of HR Max
1st repeat 16' recovery 2'30''
5th repeat 18' recovery 2'30''
6th repeat 20' recovery 3'
Agility 30' 90-100 RPM


After these four weeks you can put a week of recovery (unloading work in the plains) and then resume a course of training in climbing, but this time with a frequency appropriate to the pedalling stroke (60-80 RPM)

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